10 best things about being a cyclist

10 best things about being a cyclist

  1. Cycling keeps you healthy, fit and toned

Regular cyclists enjoy the general health of people 10 years younger, according to Sharp, the National Forum for Coronary Heart Disease Foundation. Not only does it boost your cardiovascular fitness, but it’s easy on the joints and it gives you a toned derriere and legs. Win-win!

 

  1. You get where you want, when you want

Cycling is the quickest way to travel in cities, plus you don’t have to worry about waiting for buses, leaves on train lines or parking charges. Yay!

 

  1. It burns calories

Cycling raises your metabolic rate and burns calories. A 30-minute commute should burn at least 200 calories, helping to prevent weight gain. Just don’t replace lost energy with sticky buns!

 

  1. Cycling makes you happy

Even on the days you dread the rain, you know you’ll hop off happier than if you pressed yourself into a sardine-tin train. Why? Cycling releases adrenalin and endorphins (happy hormones), which improve mental health.

 

  1. It’s a stress-buster

Cycling to work has been shown to reduce stress according to a study in the International Journal of Workplace Health Management, which revealed that for the first 45 minutes of work cyclists were less stressed than drivers – a feeling that was likely to persist throughout the day.

 

  1. Cyclists inhale fewer fumes

A 2014 study by the Healthy Air Campaign reported that cyclists experience pollution levels five times lower than drivers. And it’s easier to avoid traffic-heavy roads.

 

  1. It’s faster than walking

You’ll arrive at your destination three times more quickly for the same energy expenditure, plus cyclists who commute have lower BMIs than those who walk to work.

 

  1. It’s good for the environment

It takes around five per cent of the materials and energy used to make a car to build a bike, and cycling produces zero pollution.

 

  1. Cycling improves performance

A study published by Cyclescheme found that those who choose to ride their bike to work are more likely to progress and succeed in their careers because they are fitter and more alert. And because of the health benefits, cyclists take fewer sick days.

 

  1. It’s free… well, nearly!

Cyclescheme’s comprehensive breakdown of costs includes the price of a new bike, depreciation, new parts, services and insurance, which all works out at £396 a year – or 16p a mile. If you have your own bike, don’t pay insurance and service it yourself you can pretty much halve that amount. Either way it’s a lot cheaper than the reported average £3,727 cost of commuting by car or £1,320 by tube.

 

Cycling Utopias: Copenhagen