No Cycle insurance? Take all the details you can after an accident

No Cycle insurance? Take all the details you can after an accident

For cyclists it is easy to forget the part about exchanging insurance details post accident, primarily because cyclists often don't have insurance, but remember, the driver of the vehicle you collided with does.

If you are fortunate enough to simply dust yourself off after colliding with a vehicle you will be feeling immensely lucky. It probably won't hit home until later that the pricey bike you were riding has been damaged badly through no fault of your own. This is where the drivers insurance comes in.
 

If you were not so lucky and you have in fact been injured as a result of the collision you will want to have the details of the drivers insurance should you need financial support to get you back to health.
 

Speaking to "Cycling Fitness magazine" our very own Paul Darlington "keen cyclist and founder of Cycle-SOS, the cyclists' National Helpline" discusses the importance of showing yourself to be a conscientious cyclist should the worst happen. Wearing bright clothing and a helmet and making sure that you have a light are a good start to proving you are a sensible cyclist.
 

If you have been involved in an accident, one top tip Paul gives is to carry a few cards with you detailing your name, number, address and email address to hand out to anybody that might have witnessed the accident. "After an accident you might be too stressed to start taking witnesses' names, but with this it's very easy for people to give you a call afterwards."
 

Paul also goes on to suggest that a note is made of a) The location of the accident b) The registration of the drivers vehicle and if you are pretty sure that you are the innocent party you should call the police and log the accident.
“There is some distaste about the claim culture in modern society, but let’s make one thing clear: for drivers and their insurers the effect of a collision will be largely financial. The effects of a collision on a cyclist can be life changing.”
 

You can read the full article, including some interesting case studies in the December-February issue of Cycling fitness magazine.

For more advice you can speak to Paul Darlington or any other member of the Cycle- S.O.S team by visiting the contact pages or calling The Cyclists' National Helpline on freephone number 0808 100 9995.