What you need to know about Cure Leukaemia’s London 2 Paris: Inspiring the Revolution’ ride

What you need to know about Cure Leukaemia’s London 2 Paris: Inspiring the Revolution’ ride

Whether you are cycling in Cure Leukaemia’s London 2 Paris: Inspiring the Revolution' ride, spectating or just wish to find out more about this epic challenge, here you will find Cycle SOS’ guide to this fantastic event that we are sponsoring.

What you need to know

Setting off from London and arriving in Paris three days later, cyclists taking part in Cure Leukaemia’s London 2 Paris: Inspiring the Revolution' ride will be riding 80 miles a day and making around 458,000 revolutions of their bike wheels, as they cover the 500 kilometres from the UK capital to the French capital.

The ride, in aid of the charity, Cure Leukaemia, is part of a wider challenge organised by former footballer and leukaemia survivor Geoff Thomas. The challenge will see him and many others, including the 300 people taking part in this ride, attempt to raise £2 million in two years to battle against this rare form of blood cancer.

When will it be taking place?

The ride will be departing London in the early hours of Thursday 18th June and will make its way to Paris by Sunday 21st June.

Where does it start?

As the name suggests, London! But more specifically besides the Royal Observatory in Greenwich Park. Riders will register at Greenwich Tea Pavilions in the park between 6:30 and 7:30am, the peloton will then depart London at 8:00am.

What bikes will the participants be riding?

The bike each participant rides is largely up to them, but if we were to offer advice we advise that it is something fast, light and equipped for the road and the hill climbing challenges that the road to Paris will throw before them. It’s no place for rugged mountain bikes or leisurely roadsters.

How long will participants be riding for?

Each cyclist will be covering around 80 miles a day. On the Thursday, this will mean setting off at 8:00am. Whilst once in France, this means setting off each day at roughly 9:00am and arriving at base for for roughly 5:30pm.

There will be 2 stops on each day of the ride. The first will be for lunch, giving riders an opportunity to refuel. While the second will mid-afternoon for drinks and snacks.

Where will the ride pass through?

Starting in London, the ride will pass through the following places:

Calais

Abbeville

Beauvais

Paris

Where can you see the action?

While you won’t be able to join the ride throughout unless you are donning your lycra, there will be certain points where you will be able to see the riders. These include the Grand Départ from the Royal Observatory in Greenwich Park, day 2’s depart from Calais, day 3 in Abbeville and the peloton into the final stretch into Paris on day 4. Should you wish to see the riders finish, you will be able to on the afternoon of the 21st as they make their way on to the cobbles to the Arc de Triomphe and onto the finish line besides the Eiffel Tower.

The arrival into Paris will be spectacular with 300 riders cycling down the Champs-Elysees under full road closures. For the most impactful spectating point, it is recommended that guests make their way to the Arc De Triomphe looking down Avenue de la Grande. While riders will begin to arrive in Paris at approximately 4pm, it is advised that spectators start gathering from 3pm so not to miss out on the action.

What kit should each rider have?

For a ride of this magnitude, each rider should definitely have with them suitable cycling shoes, comfortable performance cycle clothing (yes, that means Lycra!), water, energy bars, a basic multi tool, waterproofs, base layers and importantly for the interests of safety, a cycling helmet. On this ride however, all luggage and other kit essentials will be carried by the support team.

Who makes up the support team and how many people will there be?

The support team is made up of crew, physios, mechanics, filming crew, photographers and drivers, there will also be outriders on motorbikes with the cyclists. In total, the support team will be made up of around 40 people.